Curried Sugar Hubbard Squash Soup

Curried Sugar Hubbard Squash Soup

Makes an awful lot of soup, but it keeps well and you can freeze leftovers for months.

• 4 cups roasted, smashed Sugar Hubbard squash. Substitute any firm fleshed winter squash you have on hand. Butternut is great too. Description below includes the steps to roast the squash.
• 1 large onion
• 1 knob ginger, approximately 2″ long.
• 3-4 tablespoons chicken fat (substitute lard, butter, olive oil, etc. as desired)
• Curry powder, to taste
• Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
• 2-3 qts chicken stock (substitute vegetable stock, etc. as desired)
• Best quality apple cider vinegar, to taste

I started by roasting the squash, because any time you roast a vegetable you caramelize the sugars and evaporate some of the moisture, which results in a vegetable more flavorful and sweet than it started. Cut it in big chunks, don’t bother peeling, and pop into a 375 degree oven until soft all the way through and starting to brown. How long? Depends how big your chunks are. Check after 40 minutes, but it might take twice that long for really big hunks.Scrape the skin off with a big spoon. It should pretty much fall right off. Mash up enough to measure about 4 cups. You will need your 4 cups of roasted squash, onion and knob of ginger. Peel and chop the onion and ginger. No precision necessary here. In a large pot, heat several tablespoons of the fat of your choice over med-high heat. I had rendered chicken fat so I used it. Olive oil, butter or lard are fine too. Brown the onions and ginger in the fat until they are lightly colored, then add in ½ – 2 tablespoons curry powder, depending on how much you like curry, and kosher salt & black pepper to taste. I like curry, I went for it. Stir it all up. When the curry is fragrant, add in your semi-smashed squash and 2 quarts (8 cups) chicken stock. Bring to a simmer, reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer and cook, covered, for about an hour. Use your immersion blender to puree the soup to a smooth, creamy puree. If the puree is too thick, add in additional stock or water to adjust. It should be about the thickness of heavy cream. Taste. At this point your soup will probably need more salt, and some acid. There has never, in the history of squash soup, been one made that didn’t benefit from a splash of Bragg’s Apple Cider Vinegar.Once the flavor and texture is just so, you’re ready to eat!